Category Archives: Student Loans

Useful information about student loans.

*FAFSA FRENZY*

NEED HELP FILING YOUR 2016-2017 FREE APPLICATION FOR FEDERAL STUDENT AID (FAFSA)?
*Attend a FAFSA Frenzy (a state-wide initiative) on MARCH 5, from 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM at Lybyer Technology Building!
*Volunteers will be available to assist you to file your FAFSA. You can also sign up for a State-Wide Drawing – One of Sixteen $500 Scholarships to be used at any postsecondary program in Missouri.
*REMEMBER – MARCH 31, 2016 is the DEADLINE for FAFSA to be completed in order to be considered for the Supplemental Grant, and Federal Work Study Program. Also, the majority of scholarships has a deadline of March 31, 2016.
*Happy Spring!

Look Into All Forms Of Financial Aid

A variety of financial assistance programs are available to help you fund your college education. Scholarships, grants and work-study assignments are available to students of all ages and backgrounds.

The first step for most of these programs is to complete and file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Submit your FAFSA as soon as possible after January 1 each year. You must file your FAFSA before April 1 to qualify for the Access Missouri grant.
Findout if you qualify for financial aid.

Federal Student Aid
*Federal Pell Grant
*Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)
*Teacher education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) Grant
*Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant
*Federal Work Study
*Federal Perkins Loan
*Direct Subsidized Loan
*Direct PLUS Loans

State Student Aid
*A+ Scholarship
*Access Missouri Grant
*Advanced Placement Incentive Grant
*Bright Flight Scholarship
*Kids’ Chance Scholarship
*Marguerite Ross Barnett Memorial Scholarship
*Minority Teaching Scholarship
*Minority and Underrepresented Environmental Literacy Program
*Public Service Officer Survivor Grant
*Vietnam Veteran Survivor Grant
*Wartime Veteran’s Survivors Grant

Student Loans

Steps to do before you make your 1st student loan payment.

Student loans often help make it possible to earn a degree, which over time can help you earn more. If student loans were a part of your college funding stragety, you’ll start repaying them soon. Follow these helpful tips along your path to repayment and you could be well on your way to a bright financial future.

Know what you owe. Review your federal student loan borrowing history.
-Visit StudentAid.gov and NSLDS.ed.gov to view all of your federal student loans and to find contact infrmation of your loan servicer.

Make sure your servicer knows how to contact you.
-Inform your sevicer if you change your street address or phone number.

Select the repayment plan that’s right for you.
-Research repayement options at StudentAid.gov/repay

Make on-time payments
-This helps to build and maintain a good credit rating.

Consider paying a little extra each month
-Paying just a few extra dollars of prinicpal each month can go a long way toward helping you pay off your loans faster.

Seek help at the first sign of financial difficulty.

Use deferment and forbearance only as a last resort.
-Postponing payments can cost you if unpaid accrued interest is added to the loan balance.

Navient.com

Loan Websites

Federal Student Loan Websites

Complete FAFSA® – Complete your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®) to see what aid may be available to help you pay for college

 

Federal Student Aid– Get ready for college or career school, learn about federal student aid and how to apply using the FAFSA®, and get information on repaying student loans

 

Federal Student Aid: Loan Forgiveness, Cancellation and Discharge– Find out whether you qualify due to your job, disability, the closure of your school, or other circumstances

 

Federal Student Aid: Military Student Loan Benefits– Information Members of the U.S. Armed Forces need to know about your federal student loan benefits

 

National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS)– Lets you retrieve your loan information for your federally-owned or federally-guaranteed loans including any balances and which company is servicing them

 

StudentLoans.gov– Apply online for Income Driven Repayment plans, consolidate federal student loans, complete your Master Promissory Note, complete entrance and exit counseling, and more

 

U.S. Department of Education– Provides information about the Department’s offices, programs, information and assistance services, funding opportunities, education statistics, publications and more
https://www.mohela.com/DL/resourceCenter/AdditionalResources.aspx

Financial Literacy

What is financial literacy?

Financial literacy is defined as:

  1. The ability to read, analyze, manage and communicate about the personal financial conditions affecting material well being.
  2. The term is used to describe financial education programs on college campuses and within high schools. The objective of financial literacy programs is to help students better manage their finances,budget effectively, and borrow wisely.

Smart financial management includes a few basic good habits. If you are a student, you may already have a checking account, a credit card, or maybe even a car loan. When heading off to college, you may also need to borrow student loans to help finance your education. But have you determined your financial goals and established good financial habits? Here are a few tips to get you started.

Steps you can take now to get on the right financial path

  • Take charge of your spending. Establish a budgetPDF Document; set limits and prioritize; determine the difference between needs and wants; speak with a professional, nonprofit credit counselor if needed.
  • Start saving. The earlier you save, the more you’ll have.
  • Understand the costs of credit. Compare at least three offers before you choose a credit card; look for low interest rates and no annual fees; always pay more than the minimum payment.
  • Understand how credit use affects your future. Know the difference between good and bad debt; check your credit report annually.
  • Protect your credit and your financial future. Beware of identity theft; review statements and notify creditors immediately of errors; know what’s in your wallet/purse.

Planning for Financial Success

Minimize your student loan debt by following these Top 10 ways to graduate debt free.

  1. Complete the FAFSA annually.
  2. Qualify for federal grants.
  3. Research state scholarship and grant programs.
  4. Apply for institutional scholarships.
  5. Explore private scholarships.
  6. Inquire about work programs available on your campus.
  7. Set up a payment plan for your tuition.
  8. Secure summer employment.
  9. Invest in MOST, Missouri’s 529 college savings plan.
  10. Live like a student now, so you don’t have to later.

www.dhe.mo.gov/ppc/studentloans/finacialliteracy.php

 

Loan Payments

How to Make a Payment

Making payments on your student loan with Nelnet is easy! With options to pay anytime, anywhere, you can manage your account your way. We offers a variety of payment options, including automatic debits (ACH), to let you choose a method that’s convenient for you. And, if you wish, we can send you text alerts to confirm or remind you to make your payments! See details below.

+Your Accounts, Loan Groups, and Due Dates

http://www.nelnet.com/How-To-Make-A-Payment/

Simplify Student Loans

A Proposal to Radically Simplify Student Loan Payments

By March 24, 2014


Whether students leave college with a degree or without one, they face a dizzying array of challenges—where to live, how to get a job, and increasingly, how to repay their loans. Five organizations, including the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators and Young Invincibles, have a proposal that aims to answer that last question with a streamlined and automated alternative to the complex system of repaying loans.

As of now, and with few exceptions, borrowers must start paying back their loans six months after they leave school and repay according to a standard 10-year schedule. If their monthly payment is too high, things get complicated quickly. The government has six other repayment options. Two are pretty straightforward: Borrowers can reduce monthly costs either by extending payments over 25 years or by keeping the 10-year period but starting with smaller monthly payments that gradually increase over time.

Four more plans tie payment schedules to how much the borrower earns, each with different thresholds, eligibility, and terms. Those plans are far from perfect, but advocates for student borrowers generally like them because they provide graduates with flexibility and typically forgive the remainder of the debt after 10 to 25 years. For a long time, the Department of Education struggled to get students to use the plans, though recently borrowers are signing up in greater numbers.

The proposal rolls up a number of suggested improvements into one comprehensive attempt to fix the two biggest problems: the complexity of having so many options, and the relatively low participation by borrowers. Not unlike the successful effort to encourage automatic enrollment in retirement savings plans, the groups advocate what they call “auto-IBR,” short for income-based repayment. The plan would change the default payment option from the standard 10-year term to a repayment schedule that’s tied to a percentage of the borrower’s income and eventually forgives the remaining balance after a certain period of time. It also suggests the payments be automatically deducted from a borrower’s paycheck, similar to the way Social Security is collected, an idea championed last year by Representative Tom Petri, a Republican from Wisconsin.

The plan recommends various ways to make this work. One option is to require borrowers to pay 18 percent of everything they earn above $25,000 a year; another sets the payment level at 10 percent of income above $10,000 a year. The proposal also suggests longer terms for borrowers who take out a lot of debt, at least $50,000 or $60,000 in different scenarios. That’s to minimize giving a disproportionate benefit to students who borrow a lot—looking at you, law students!—and could see huge amounts forgiven. While this all may sound a bit complicated, it’s far simpler than the current situation.

Source: http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-03-24/student-loan-payments-can-be-simplified-reform-advocates-say

Payment Options

Repaying your student loans

Sallie Mae is committed to giving you the information and tools you need to understand and evaluate your student loan payment options. We can help you find an option that fits your budget, simplifies payment, and minimizes your total interest cost.

Before you choose a repayment plan

  • Understand the repayment options available to you. Sallie Mae offers standard, graduated, income-sensitive, income-based and extended repayment plans on federal student loans.
  • Realize that combined billing is available for Sallie Mae-serviced loans.*
  • Compare your repayment options. Estimate your monthly student loan payments for eligible Sallie Mae loans with our Loan Repayment Calculator. Or, if your loans are in repayment, you can view repayment plans that may be available for your loans at Manage Your Loans
  • Know that you can prepay your loans in part or in full at any time without penalty. This will lower the overall cost of your loan.
  • Realize the importance of paying back your student loans.
  • Understand that choosing a plan with lower payments may result in higher costs over the life of the loan.

Lower monthly payments

Payment amount reduction may be available for those who qualify. Federal student loan repayment plans offering lower monthly payment amounts than the standard repayment plan are:

Lowest overall loan cost

Make level monthly payments of principal and interest to help control interest costs.

Postpone your payments

Private student loans

Eligibility for Sallie Mae private student loan repayment plans may vary by loan type, loan balance, and disbursement date.

The Sallie Mae Smart Option Student LoanSM first disbursed June 1, 2009 and later requires monthly interest-only payments during the in-school and separation periods. Check the terms of your loan’s specific Promissory Note and log in to Manage Your Loans to see if your loan status shows repayment. If so, and you are enrolled in school, then you are not eligible for other repayment options at this time.
Private student loans first disbursed before June 1, 2009, may be eligible for graduated repayment to lower the initial monthly loan payments.

*Combined billing is available for eligible student loans that are serviced by Sallie Mae. Some restrictions may apply.

Source: https://www.collegeanswer.com/manage-your-money/manage-student-loans/student-loan-repayment-options/

Helpful

Calculators

Repayment Amortization

You can estimate your payments with various interest rates and loan terms using this calculator.

Repayment Plan

You can estimate your payments under various repayment plans using this calculator.

Income-Based Repayment

This calculator can help you determine if you qualify for the Income-Based Repayment(IBR) plan. IBR is designed to make payments more affordable for borrowers.

Income Contingent Repayment

This calculator can help you determine if you qualify for the Income Contingent Repayment (ICR) plan.The Income Contingent Repayment plan is based on your Adjusted Gross Income.

https://www.mohela.com/DL/calculators/default.aspx