Transitions

To signal relationships or shifts in meaning, a transition connects one paragraph, sentence, clause, or word with another. A transition also identifies what kind of connection exists, helping readers anticipate how the next paragraph or sentence will relate to the meaning of what they have just read.

Following are the groups of transitions, what they signal, and examples of each:
Chronological Transitions. . .Relationship in time:
presently
meanwhile
the next day
With that finished
thereupon
at length
second
then
immediately
soon afterward
when I returned
thereafter
afterward
after that
by that time
Following this
next
beforehand
first
later
soon
at that moment
at last
earlier
within an hour
shortly
from then on
finally
1.    Spatial Transitions. . .Relationship in space:
a little farther on
at the edge of the clearing
above
in the next room
at the center of the circle
below
at that altitude
across the way
beyond this point
between those cities
about a foot to the left
just to the right
2.    Comparison Transitions. . .What follows is similar to what precedes:
likewise
once again
similarly
in the same way
in like manner
at the same time
3.    Contrast Transitions. . .A contradiction or contrast:
however
conversely
nevertheless
notwithstanding
whereas
still
even so
For all that
surely
unlike
on the other hand
In contrast
nonetheless
on the contrary
in spite of this
dissimilarly
4.    Middle Paragraph Transitions. . .What follows is an illustration, a qualification, or an example:
for example
for instance
likewise
specifically
frequently
in particular
similarly
to illustrate
whenever
that is
in general
occasionally
generally
especially
usually
5.    What follows is additional or supplementary:
furthermore
besides
Then, too
moreover
as if that were not enough
again
and
indeed
In addition
in fact
first, second, third. . .
also
6.    What follows is quite expected, quite natural, or obviously true:
to be sure
it follows, then, that
surely
of course
for that matter
without a doubt
naturally
as a matter of fact
obviously then
7.    Cause-Effect Transitions. . .What follows is a result of what precedes:
as a result
as a consequence
so
thus
consequently
another
therefore
then
hence
in other words
wherefore
at last
for this reason
and that is why
first
second
on the whole
accordingly
and so
finally
all in all
8.    Counterargument Transitions. . .For concession:
of course
Certainly
to doubt that
doubtless
to be sure
granted
9.    End of Paragraph or Conclusion Transitions. . .What follows is a repetition or intensification of that which precedes:
in other words
Indeed
as noted earlier
to repeat
in any case
besides
as we have seen
in fact
to sum up
10.Conclusion Transitions. . .What follows is a summary:
therefore
all in all
in short
In summary
in a word
on the whole
in conclusion
In brief
what we have, then
in sum
to summarize
finally